100 Functional Life Skills IEP Goals | Independent Functioning (2022)

Independent Functioning IEP Goals for Life Skills

Before I get started with this list of Life Skills Functional Goals for an IEP, I want to make one thing clear. That is, remember, IEPs are all about the “I.” Any student who has life skills listed as an area of need can have life skills IEP goals. They do not need to be in the life skills classroom to receive this.

Yes, some students are on a functional path rather than an academic one. However, you can still be in gen ed classes and need extra help with some of your functional life skills. This would include social skills IEP goals, as we all need those to be successful. I have those in another post.

100 Functional Life Skills IEP Goals | Independent Functioning (1)

Please make sure you visit my complete listing of IEP Goal Ideas!

And, while it’s completely appropriate for a student to spend their 13th and 14th year working exclusively toward these goals, I’m leery of that idea. The reason being that 2-3 years is not enough time to learn them. That’s why a solid IEP with transition services is so important.

Adding CBI Community Based Instruction can be done at any age. It’s not just for those in a life skills classroom. That may be school policy and practice, but that’s not what IDEA says.

This list of IEP goals is to help you and your team focus on independent functioning. Many students will need supported living situations, but just because a person needs supports doesn’t mean we shouldn’t maximize their abilities.

(Video) IEP goals for Real Life

Remember, inclusion means contribution. We want our kids included in society as adults, and that means contributing to the maximum extent possible. Everyone has something to contribute.

It’s important to remember, and to encourage our kids, that for some of them these skills may not be evident right now. But, that doesn’t mean that they are not attainable. Some kids may not be ready for this until age 20, 25 or even later. And that’s ok.

I’ve had several clients over the years who were not ready for these things by age 17 or 18 and felt defeated by that.

Life Skills-IEP Goals and Objectives

You may look at this list and say, “hey, you said these were IEP transition goals! These are just independent living skills!”

However, it’s easy to form them into transition IEP goals and objectives. To make them measurable, you plug the skill into the formula below.

(Video) Multidimensional Assessment of Executive Function Across the Life Span

To make it a goal with objectives, you add the subsets of skills to the main skill.

For example “student will demonstrate independence in completing banking skills necessary for independent living” or something like that. Then, add in the objectives such as creating a budget, explain the concept of saving, demonstrate how to use a check card, demonstrate what to do if card is declined, etc.

As always, you can put any skill into the IEP goal formula to make it measurable.

100 Functional Life Skills IEP Goals | Independent Functioning (2)

Independent Living Skills

I compiled this list from numerous lists I saw online to make it more comprehensive. The printable list of independent living skills is at the bottom of the post.

(Video) Clearing up misconceptions about executive function skills - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt

It may seem overwhelming. And, you might be doing some of these skills and tasks for your child. That’s fine! That is what supported living is all about. What’s important is that maximum level of independence is being supported. And that your child is as independent and as safe as possible.

I saw some outdated sentences. Things like referencing payphones and phone books. So I changed those but please let me know if you find another error.

Independent Functioning Reading Goals

  1. The student will identify personal data that have been written by others when this personal information appears on documents.
    1. Identify his or her name when it appears in written materials.
    2. Identify his or her address when it appears in written materials.
    3. Identify his or her social security number when it appears in written materials.
  2. The student will operate tools, appliances, and equipment in response to written information/instructions and markings on buttons, switches, dials, and gauges.
    1. Operate appliances and equipment involved in food storage, meal preparation, and meal cleanup activities (refrigerator, food scale, toaster, toaster oven, microwave, stove, oven, blender, electric mixer, and dishwasher etc.).
    2. Operate appliances and equipment involved in maintaining clothing and household linens (washer, dryer, and iron).
    3. Operate a telephone and a telephone answering machine.
    4. Operate appliances involved in grooming activities (hair dryer or blower and electric or battery-operated shaver).
    5. Operate equipment involved in recreational/educational activities (toys and games; television; radio; VCR; personal computer; DVD player, video games, cassette tape player, and CD players).
    6. Operate equipment and other objects involved in maintaining and monitoring his or her health (bathroom scale, heating pad, and thermometer).
    7. Operate appliances and equipment involved in heating and ventilation (thermostat, fan, air conditioner, and electric blanket).
    8. Operate tools and appliances involved in household maintenance and repairs (hand vacuum, vacuum cleaner, electric broom, and Swifter/Clorox wet mops).
    9. Utilize information as he or she travels in the community, including operating a self-service elevator and paying the correct or most efficient fare when using Van Go or taxi
    10. Using information found on labels, identify the contents of containers.
    11. Use the size of packages and size notations to determine the quantity of food and other substances in the packages.
    12. Using the price labels, tags, and store signs, identify the prices of items being considered for purchase.
    13. Identify and obey storing and cooking directions found on food packages.
  3. Locate information in the help wanted and other classified sections of newspapers and magazines (online) and use the information in seeking employment and making purchases.
    1. Locate information of interest in printed advertisements and use the information to purchase goods and services.
    2. Review pamphlets, brochures, and manuals and use the information to make decisions on recreational, educational, vocational, and other activities.

Independent Living Safety Goals

  1. Will locate familiar school places (nurse, library, vice-principal, cafeteria, elective classes, etc.).
  2. Will identify a home address
  3. Will identify the address and phone number.
  4. Will carry identification in the wallet
  5. Will practice safety rules with reminders.
  6. Will practice safety rules without reminders.
  7. Will follow pedestrian signs and conventions.
  8. Will identify rules regarding interactions with strangers
  9. Will be able to use appropriate transportation.
  10. Will follow safety rules
  11. Will read and follow safety signs
  12. Will demonstrate pedestrian skills.
  13. Will practice stranger safety
  14. The student comprehends and responds appropriately to written information, including symbols, words, and phrases that appear in the community.
    1. Locate public bathrooms to use for washing and toileting.
    2. Using numeral and destination designations, identify buses for traveling in and out of the community. (public access transportation)
    3. Identify and obeys traffic signs.
    4. Identify and obey warning signs and avoid places designated as being dangerous.
    5. Identify warning words on packages and obey their instructions.
    6. Identify and comply with signs that help direct people as they move about the community, such as arrows, detour signs, and signs that contain words such as PUSH, PULL, ENTRANCE, EXIT, IN, and OUT.
    7. Locate signs on doors and store windows and then use the information found there to identify the days and hours when the store or business is open. (yes, I see this as safety because you do not want an unattended autistic or otherwise disabled person trying to get into closed businesses!)
    8. Locate public telephones and public booths.
    9. The student will seek the assistance of a responsible person to decode and explain, when necessary, printed and written material that he or she is unable to read.
  15. Meet buses, carpools, and shuttle services after reviewing written departure schedules.
  16. Pay the correct fare on a taximeter when using a taxi (in special instances) to go to work, and tips the driver appropriately.
  17. Take the correct bus or other public transportation to work, using numeral and destination signs on public transportation vehicles.
  18. Select alternate routes to get to work.
  19. Obey traffic signs and signals and follow prescribed routes while driving to work.

Activities of Daily Living IEP Goals

Ok, this section is super long. At some point, even though a student may actually need dozens of these, you may want to chunk them together as goals with objectives underneath.

  1. Identify the written names and/or relationship names of family members.
  2. Identify the written names of important objects found in and around his or her school and home.
  3. Identify frequently used action words when they are written.
  4. Identify frequently used prepositions when they are written.
  5. Identify the numbers 1 through 12 when they are written.
  6. Identify time notations.
  7. Identify money designations when they are written as numerals.
  8. Follow directions written on packages of food, household cleaning products, and other packages and containers.
  9. Follow instructions on cleaning labels that are found on clothing and other fabrics.
  10. Verify size labels when purchasing clothing and household linens.
  11. Identify the correct value of stamps needed to mail letters and greeting cards.
  12. Identify the cost of admission at public facilities.
  13. Identify the types of stores or businesses by their window displays and by keywords on signs.
  14. Identify and obey storage and cleaning instructions found on packages containing laundry and house cleaning agents.
  15. Locate doorbells and mailboxes of friends and relatives.
  16. Operate vending machines.
  17. Operate coin-operated washers and dryers.

Life Skills Math Goals for an IEP

Please note that I have previously done another post about IEP goals for Money Skills.

  1. Match objects to objects (one-to-one correspondence).
  2. Count with meaning.
  3. Identify and match numerals.
  4. Match objects that occur in pairs.
  5. Identify the basic shapes of a circle, triangle, square, and rectangle when they have functional relevance.
  6. Discriminate between left and right.
  7. Use a number line.
  8. Identify the ordinal positions of people and objects.
  9. Follow oral directions involving a sequence of steps described in their ordinal sequence.
  10. Identify numerals of personal importance (such as birth date, age, address, telephone number, and social security number) when this information appears on written materials and documents.
  11. Write numerals when supplying personal data on various forms and documents.
  12. Identify the written expression for numerals when it appears in written materials.
  13. Write the written expression for numerals when requested to do so on checks, deposit and withdrawal slips, and other financial transactions.
  14. Identify the fractions ½, 1/3, and ¼ when they occur alone and when they are part of simple mixed numbers.
  15. Correctly compute simple subtraction problems when presented with various terms for subtracting: take away, minus, and subtract.
  16. Use the process signs (-) and (+) in addition and subtraction when given simple arithmetic problems.
  17. Identify and use numbers appearing on common equipment, appliances, and materials.
  18. Discriminate between large and small and big and little items.
  19. Discriminate between short and tall and short and long.
  20. Discriminate between full and empty.
  21. Use ruler to measure the dimension of objects and things.
  22. Use measuring cups and spoons in cooking and other functional activities.
  23. Use a scale to measure his or her weight and a food scale to measure in food preparation activities.
  24. Uses a yardstick and a measuring tape to measure length, width, depth, and height.
  25. Measure objects and recipe items using whole numbers, fractions (1/2, 1/3, and ¼), and mixed numbers.
  26. Estimate size, distance, and quantity.

IEP Goals for Telling Time

  1. Identify and name specific times of day (morning, afternoon, and night) and match the time of day with appropriate activities.
  2. Identify and name the days of the week.
  3. Identify and name the months of the year.
  4. Identify and name the current day and date.
  5. Identify and name the current season and the other seasons in sequence.
  6. Identify his or her birthday and birth date.
  7. Identify and name the major holidays.
  8. Identify and name clocks and watches.
  9. Identify and name the time by the hour and half-hour on different types of clocks and watches (digital, wrist, numeral, etc).
  10. Be punctual to school, leisure time, and other appointments and scheduled activities.

Recreation IEP Goals

Yes, recreation is important. Our kids need to know how to constructively spend their down time.

(Video) Essential for Living: Intro to the quick assessment

  1. Using a calendar, identify the date, approaching dates, and previous dates.
  2. Use a hand-drawn map to find his or her way around the school building, and use floor plan maps located in stores and office buildings.
  3. Use a hand-drawn map to find his or her way around the community.
  4. Use public transportation maps.
  5. Use diagrams to assemble objects.
  6. Use diagrams to make simple constructions and other arts and crafts projects.
  7. Locate key information on posters and other informational charts.
  8. Locate and record information on charts used for instructional and behavioral management purposed, including those used to assist the student in monitoring his or progress.
  9. Use menus to order meals and snacks.
  10. Participate in games of make-believe and role-playing.
  11. Select durable and safe toys and games.
  12. Engage in water play.
  13. Participate in low-activity games.
  14. Participate in high-activity games.
  15. Participate in target games.
  16. Participate in balance games.
  17. Participate in table games.
  18. Participate in card games.
  19. Participate in games of chance.
  20. Participate in strategy games.
  21. Participate in real-life games.
  22. Participate in knowledge and word games.
  23. Choose a variety of toys and games.
  24. Participate in multiple types of video games
  25. The student will locate and utilize information from directories, schedules, and bulletin boards.
  26. Locate telephone numbers in his or her personal telephone directory.
  27. Locate apartments by using directories located in apartment houses and other homes with multiple living units.
  28. Locate a desired floor from a department store directory.
  29. Locate offices and other locations in various buildings by using their directories.
  30. Identify times of mail pickup on mailbox schedules.
  31. Finds the location of foods and other items from supermarket directories.
  32. Identify foods and food prices from the cafeteria and fast-food bulletin boards.
  33. Locate departure and arrival times from bus, train, and airline schedules, bulletin boards, and television monitors.
  34. The student will correctly carry out directions written on equipment, machinery, games, toys, and items that are to be assembled.
  35. Follow the directions provided with toys and games.
  36. Follow the directions provided with objects to be assembled.
  37. Using a calendar, identify the date, approaching dates, and previous dates.
  38. Use a hand-drawn map to find his or her way around the school building, and use floor plan maps located in stores and office buildings.
  39. Use a hand-drawn map to find his or her way around the community.
  40. Use public transportation maps.
  41. Use diagrams to assemble objects.
  42. Use diagrams to make simple constructions and other arts and crafts projects.
  43. Locate key information on posters and other informational charts.
  44. Locate and record information on charts used for instructional and behavioral management purposed, including those used to assist the student in monitoring his or progress.
  45. Use menus to order meals and snacks.
  46. Participate in games of make-believe and role-playing.
  47. Select durable and safe toys and games.
  48. Engage in water play.
  49. Participate in low-activity games.
  50. Participate in high-activity games.
  51. Participate in target games.
  52. Participate in balance games.
  53. Participate in table games.
  54. Participate in card games.
  55. Participate in games of chance.
  56. Participate in strategy games.
  57. Participate in real-life games.
  58. Participate in knowledge and word games.
  59. Choose a variety of toys and games.
  60. Participate in multiple types of video games
  61. The student will locate and utilize information from directories, schedules, and bulletin boards.
  62. Locate telephone numbers in his or her personal telephone directory.
  63. Locate apartments by using directories located in apartment houses and other homes with multiple living units.
  64. Locate the desired floor from a department store directory.
  65. Locate offices and other locations in various buildings by using their directories.
  66. Identify times of mail pickup on mailbox schedules.
  67. Finds the location of foods and other items from supermarket directories.
  68. Identify foods and food prices from the cafeteria and fast-food bulletin boards.
  69. Locate departure and arrival times from bus, train, and airline schedules, bulletin boards, and television monitors.
  70. The student will correctly carry out directions written on equipment, machinery, games, toys, and items that are to be assembled.
  71. Follow the directions provided with toys and games.
  72. Follow the directions provided with objects to be assembled.
  73. Engage in a variety of activities using park and playground facilities and equipment.
  74. Participate in fishing activities.
  75. Participate in camping activities.
  76. Plan and go on a walk and/or hiking trip.
  77. Participate in nature exploration activities.
  78. Raise and care for houseplants.
  79. Raise and care for a pet.
  80. Collect leaves, rocks, and shells for a collection, crafts, and/or decorating projects.
  81. Engage in photography and other art experiences based on natural themes.
  82. Engage in quiet activities, such as looking at picture books and magazines, playing electronic games, and listening to the radio or stereo.
  83. Watch television, videotapes, and discs.
  84. Play games on computer, television, or hand-held machines.
    • Plan and host a party.
  85. Go to fast food restaurants, cafeterias, snack shops, and other restaurants.
  86. Attend movies, puppet shows, concerts and plays.
  87. Plan and participate in picnics, outings, and excursions.
  88. Participate in special events, such as holiday parties, programs, dances, and the Special Olympics.
  89. Locate and participate in clubs, special-interest groups, and events sponsored by schools, recreation councils, and community groups, such as scouts/Indian Guides, 4-H clubs, and garden clubs.
  90. Take vacations and go on other trips.
  91. Visit relatives, friends and neighbors.
  92. The student will identify activities and opportunities to use as hobbies.

Independent Living/Work IEP Skills

  1. The student will identify keywords found on employment applications and other simple blanks and forms, and provide the requested information.
  2. The student will locate and utilize written information found on bills, work time cards, check stubs, and store receipts.
  3. Pay by the due date, the correct amount for goods received and services obtained.
  4. Identify and verify gross pay, net pay, and deduction information found on paycheck stubs.
  5. Check store receipts to verify that they are correct and that any change received is also correct.
  6. Verify information found on work time cards.
  7. Print his or her name and write his or her signature.
  8. Write his or her parent’s names on a card/envelope
  9. Write the date in its various forms.
  10. Write his or her address on an envelope
  11. Write his or her age and birth date using numerals, abbreviations, and words.
  12. Will follow a familiar purchasing routine with assistance (without assistance).
  13. Will demonstrate socially acceptable behavior in the community
  14. Will use community services (post office, library, DMV, etc.) with assistance (without assistance)
  15. Will purchase items in a familiar store.
  16. Will participate in organized school or community service activities.
  17. Will shop for personal clothing items knowing their own sizes.
  18. Correctly address envelopes, postcards, and packages to be mailed
  19. Write shopping and other lists
  20. Identify keywords, abbreviations, and symbols (FIRST NAME, LAST NAME, MAIDEN NAME, M.I.; ADDRESS; DATE; HOME TELEPHONE #, WORK TELEPHONE #; BIRTHDATE; SOCIAL SECURITY #; SEX – M OR F; MARITAL STATUS – M, S, W, OR D; PREVIOUS EMPLOYMENT RECORD; PARENTS’ NAMES; REFERENCES; ACCOUNT NUMBERS; DEPOSIT; WITHDRAWAL; CASH; etc.) found on employment applications, deposit and withdrawal slips, checks, mail order forms, and other simple blanks and forms and provide the requested information.
  21. Identify the skills required in job descriptions and/or brochures.
  22. Locate the help wanted section of newspapers and identify job offerings appropriate to his or her interests, needs, and skills.
  23. Identify common abbreviations used in the help wanted sections of newspapers and determine what they mean.
  24. Locate job announcement information found on business bulletin boards, in work pamphlets, at state and local job banks, and at employment agencies.
  25. Obtain a job application form and identify keywords that request personal data information, including name, address, telephone number, Social Security number, and birth date.
  26. Obtain and review all job-related brochures and forms, including health insurance, pension information, holiday schedules, and other components in an employee benefits package.
  27. Use a calendar to identify workdays and holidays when he or she does not have to go to work.
  28. Follow a daily wake-up schedule that makes it possible for him or her to wash, dress, and groom him- or herself and be ready for work on time.
  29. Identify time by the hour, half-hour, and other intervals, on clocks and watches, to be prepared to leave for work on time.
  30. Select the type of clothing and accessories needed from a specially prepared work-clothing list for specific jobs.
  31. Locate the number of his employer or employer representative in his or her personal telephone directory and call that person if unable to report to work or when he or she will be late.
  32. Follow directions on the time clock and time card and verify the time card after punching in and out to make certain it had been correctly stamped.
  33. Identify work clothing, shop coats, and other personal items by nametags and labels.
  34. Obey health rules pertinent to his or her job.
  35. Obey safety rules pertaining to his or her job.
  36. Follow the directions and safety instructions on flammable and other dangerous substances with which he or she works.
  37. Follow posted directions and routing signs for fire escape procedures and use them during a fire emergency and fire drill.
  38. Follow the operating and safety instructions for electric tools, appliances, and machinery used on the job.
  39. Locate signs leading to the supervisor, nurse, or other significant persons’ offices and go there when necessary.

Personal Hygiene Care IEP Goals

  1. When requiring supervision or assistance, indicates in an acceptable manner, the need to go to the bathroom.
  2. When independent in toileting, closes the bathroom door and/or stall for privacy.
  3. Remove, lower, unfasten, and/or open appropriate clothing before toileting.
  4. When appropriate, either raise the toilet seat for voiding or use a urinal.
  5. Sit on the toilet seat for eliminating or for voiding.
  6. Wipe appropriately after voiding or eliminating.
  7. Flush the toilet after wiping, or flushes the urinal after voiding.
  8. Wash and dry hands after toileting.
  9. Dress and/or arrange clothing after toileting.
  10. Locate and use a bathroom or public restroom independently and safely
  11. Put on and remove clothing with no fasteners.
  12. Put on and remove clothing with zippers.
  13. Put on and remove clothing with snaps.
  14. Put on and remove clothing with buttons.
  15. Put on and remove clothing with Velcro fasteners.
  16. Adjust clothing when necessary.
  17. Choose clothing appropriate for the weather.
  18. Choose clothing appropriate to the time of day, situation, and occasion.
  19. Control the water flow or adjusts the water temperature for washing hands and face.
  20. Wash and dry hands and face.
  21. Wash underarms and uses deodorant.
  22. Brush and floss teeth and rinse mouth.
  23. Clean and care for nails.
  24. Wipe and blow nose.
  25. Take a sponge bath.
  26. Bath in a tub.
  27. Take a shower.
  28. Wash and dry hair.
  29. Comb, set, and/or style hair or have it done professionally.
  30. Shave face or body hair when appropriate.
  31. Use facial blemish treatments when needed.
  32. Apply makeup when appropriate.
  33. Use and care for eyeglasses, hearing aids, and prosthetic devices when appropriate.
  34. Care for herself during menstruation.

I am aware that this is a huge list! However, the family and the school should work together on prioritizing the needs. And, it can point you toward what services are needed for transition and perhaps that 13th and 14th year.

FAQs

What is an example of a functional goal? ›

Refer to the following examples: Goal: José will participate in meals, self-care routines and when moving from one activity to another by using three- to four-word phrases to make requests of adults, two times a day for two weeks. of adults, two times a day for two weeks.

What are some life skills goals? ›

Some daily living skills include taking care of your school supplies, tidying up your desk, meal planning, cooking for yourself or others, cleaning, taking care of personal hygiene, getting dressed or undressed, shopping for daily needs, planning daily activities (such as hiking), etc.

What does independent functioning mean? ›

Noun. independent function (plural independent functions) (mathematics) Any of a set of functions the value of which can not be deduced from that of all the others.

What is a functional goal? ›

We define functional goals as the individually meaningful activities that a person cannot perform as a result of an injury, illness, or congenital or acquired condition, but wants to be able to accomplish as a result of physical therapy.

What are some independent functioning goals? ›

Time management and transitioning (the ability to effectively utilize and understand the passage of time) Reliance on routines (the need for predictability and stability; difficulty with changes) Communication and self-advocacy (the ability to express wants and needs)

What are functional skills for an IEP? ›

Functional skills are skills an individual needs to live as independently as possible. Functional skills describe the routine activities of everyday life -- communication, mobility, behavior, social skills, and daily living skills.

What are some examples of IEP goals? ›

Some examples of possible IEP goal focus areas identified within the present levels are: Reading comprehension, fluency skills, communication, time-management, self-advocacy, self-regulation, organization, independent travel, interpersonal and social skills, college and career exploration, math skills, fine motor ...

What are independent life skills? ›

Independent living skills are skills that an individual needs in order to perform activities of daily living, including eating, cleaning, and maintaining personal hygiene. Like their sighted counterparts, children with vision impairments can and should begin learning independent living skills from birth.

What does functional performance mean on an IEP? ›

Functional Performance — “is generally understood as referring to 'skills or activities that are not considered academic or related to a child's academic achievement. '” This term “is often used in the context of routine activities of everyday living.” (71 Fed.

What are some IEP goals for autism? ›

IEP Goals for Autism
  • Understanding their own and others emotions.
  • Understanding others body language and monitoring their own.
  • Understanding facial expressions during conversations.
  • Initiating (in social situations)
  • Maintaining (friendships and conversations)
  • Responding (to another person's initiation)

What are the three types of functional needs special education? ›

We can separate the functional skills as:
  • Life Skills.
  • Functional Academic Skills.
  • Community-Based Learning Skills.
  • Social Skills.
16 Jul 2019

How is functional independence achieved? ›

The functional independence of a module can be judged using two concepts: cohesion and coupling: cohesion is the degree to which a module performs only one function. coupling is the degree to which a module requires other modules to perform its function.

What goal considered a functional treatment goal? ›

A function-based treatment strategy measures a patient's progress not in pain relief, but in his or her ability to function better in life. Functional goals would include sleeping, walking, working, connecting with friends, etc.

What are the 3 types of goals? ›

There are three types of goals- process, performance, and outcome goals. Process goals are specific actions or 'processes' of performing. For example, aiming to study for 2 hours after dinner every day .

What are the 5 smart goals? ›

The SMART in SMART goals stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound.

Can you get an IEP for executive functioning disorder? ›

Executive-function problems are covered under IEPs. ADHD, essentially an executive-function impairment, is specifically covered under the Other Health Impaired (OHI) category in IDEA. Many school districts, though, will try to direct parents toward a 504 Plan.

What are some goals for autistic children? ›

Develop conversational skills for interacting with peers and adults. Use and understand nonverbal communication such as gestures. Interpret facial expressions. Become comfortable engaging in functional, spontaneous dialogue.

What is a math problem solving goal for IEP? ›

Tabulate and solve graphs based on equations and inequalities. One-step and multi-step linear equations to be solved using correct strategies 8/10 times with 80% accuracy. Determine slope with at least 80% accuracy from given ordered pairs or equations or graphs.

What are the six areas of functioning? ›

The Six Areas of Academic and Functional Skill
  • Academics. ...
  • Cognitive Learning. ...
  • Communication. ...
  • Independence and Self-Determination. ...
  • Physical and Health. ...
  • Social and Emotional Learning.

How do you write a present level of performance for an IEP individualized education plan of your pupil with disability? ›

How to write present level of performance examples
  1. Describe Your child's learning strengths. ...
  2. Describe your child's weaknesses. ...
  3. Provide objective data from your child's evaluation results. ...
  4. Write a paragraph containing the information gathered in the prior steps.

What are functional academics examples? ›

Functional academics are defined as academic areas that will be used by the student for the rest of their life. For example: Reading (read signs; stop, go, men's, women's, read a recipe). Math (money, grocery shopping, making change, budget). Health (grooming, oral hygiene, plan healthy meals).

What 4 elements must be contained in every IEP goal? ›

Each goal has four elements: a target behavior, the conditions under which the target behavior will be exhibited and measured, the criterion for acceptable performance, and the timeframe within which the student will meet the criterion.

How would you summarize the ESY program? ›

Extended school year (ESY) services are special education and related services that are provided to a student with a disability beyond the regular school year in accordance with his/her IEP. The need for ESY services must be determined annually on an individual basis by the Individual Education Program (IEP) team.

How do you write a good IEP goal and objective? ›

Write down several statements about what you want your child to know and be able to do. Revise these statements into goals that are specific, measurable, use action words, are realistic, and time-limited. Break down each goal into a few measurable short-term steps. Describe what the child will know or be able to do.

What is the difference between ILS and SLS? ›

What is the Difference Between SLS and ILS? SLS is focused on residential services and supported living arrangements for consumers. On the other hand, Independent Living Skills Training (ILS) teaches consumers essential skills and personal care for their daily lives.

What are independent living skills for the blind? ›

Independent Living Skills are the skills required to meet the challenges of daily living, including time management, dressing, personal care, eating, cooking, and household management.

What is Plaafp in IEP? ›

A fully developed, well-written present level of academic achievement and functional performance statement, or PLAAFP, is the foundation of the individualized education program (IEP) and is used to specify appropriate goals, services, supports, accommodations, and placement for the student.

What are the components of a Plaafp? ›

  • A well-written PLAAFP statement will describe: ...
  • Current Information From a Variety of Sources. ...
  • Spotlights The Area(s) of Need. ...
  • Describes the Student's Current Performance in Measurable Terms. ...
  • Provides Baseline Data to Measure Progress and Starting Place for Instruction. ...
  • Focused Instructional Support.
29 Jun 2020

Why are functional goals important? ›

Functional goals are developed specifically for the child by his or her occupational and/or physical therapist, with parent input, in order to objectively measure the child's progress in therapy over a period of time.

Which goal is considered a functional treatment goal? ›

A function-based treatment strategy measures a patient's progress not in pain relief, but in his or her ability to function better in life. Functional goals would include sleeping, walking, working, connecting with friends, etc.

What is a functional objective in education? ›

Definition. A functional goal outlines a target skill to be acquired in measurable terms, while including a precise behavior to be accomplished and a specific criterion.

What are strategic goals in business? ›

A strategic goal is a long-term, “big picture” objective for a business, rather than a short-term tactic that addresses a current problem or challenge. Strategies help the business improve the way it operates and set new goals, as opposed to goals that simply improve or fix what the company is already doing.

What is functional performance on an IEP? ›

Functional Performance — “is generally understood as referring to 'skills or activities that are not considered academic or related to a child's academic achievement. '” This term “is often used in the context of routine activities of everyday living.” (71 Fed.

What are the three types of functional needs special education? ›

We can separate the functional skills as:
  • Life Skills.
  • Functional Academic Skills.
  • Community-Based Learning Skills.
  • Social Skills.
16 Jul 2019

What is a functional life skills curriculum? ›

The Functional Life Skills curriculum is a curriculum designed to introduce, systematically teach and apply daily living skills and pre-vocational skills essential for personal independence. The curriculum is meant to span over the course of 3 years.

What are the goals for people with low back injuries? ›

Goals include short-term pain relief, an improved ability to achieve self-sedation, abdominal and lumbar muscle strengthening, increased hip and lumbar spine mobility, improved lumbar and pelvic proprioceptive sensibility, intervertebral joint stabilization, lumbar posture modification and improved general fitness.

How long is a long term goal in PT? ›

Citations are provided for your continued review. Long Term Goal: Perform upper body dressing independently in unsupported sitting within 6 months. support for 3/5 attempts, to increase level of independence with dressing.

What are the 4 components of a behavioral objective? ›

These four parts are: (a) the subject, (b) the observable behavior to be performed, (c) the conditions in which the behavior should be performed, and (d) the standards for the minimal acceptable level of performance when performing the behavior.

What are the three types of behavioral objectives? ›

KNOWLEDGE: remembering previously learned facts. COMPREHENSION: ability to understand or grasp the meaning of material. APPLICATION: ability to use previously learned material in new and concrete situations.

What are the 3 objectives in lesson plan? ›

Cognitive objectives emphasize THINKING, Affective objectives emphasize FEELING and. Psychomotor objectives emphasize ACTING.

What are the 5 smart goals examples? ›

Personal SMART Goal Examples
  • Get Fit. Weak Goal Example: I'm going to get fit. SMART Goal Example: ...
  • Achieve a Personal Project. Weak Goal Example: I'm going to write a book. SMART Goal Example: ...
  • Improve Relationships. Weak Goal Example: I'm going to improve my relationships. SMART Goal Example:
22 Mar 2021

What are the 8 major areas for strategic goals? ›

The basic strategic variables for consideration as you make a plan for the future are products, services, customers, markets, finances, people, technology, and production capability.

What are the 4 main components of a balanced scorecard? ›

The balanced scorecard involves measuring four main aspects of a business: Learning and growth, business processes, customers, and finance. BSCs allow companies to pool information in a single report, to provide information into service and quality in addition to financial performance, and to help improve efficiencies.

Videos

1. DCN Goal Writing Series - Goal writing and executive functioning
(Diagnostic Center North)
2. Ep 006 Executive Function Skills: What Every Parent Needs to Know
(ImpactParents)
3. Back-to-School Playbook: Evidence-Based Strategies for Helping Neurodivergent Kids and Teens Succeed
(Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment)
4. DCN Goal Writing Series - Goal writing for students with extensive supports/functional skills
(Diagnostic Center North)
5. Function at The Forefront: A Conversation about Vision Rehabilitation
(National Eye Institute, NIH)
6. FROM EVALUATIONS TO THE IEP (2 CEUS AVAILABLE!)
(ABAskills, LLC)

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