Special Educational Needs - childlawadvice.org.uk (2023)

This pageprovides information on the duties of schools and Local Authorities to assess, identify and provide for a child’s SEN within school.

What are Special Educational Needs (SEN)?

Section 20 Children and Families Act 2014 defines a child as having Special Educational Needs (SEN) if he or she "has a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special education provision to be made for him or her".

A child is considered to have a learning difficulty if she or he:

  • has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age; or
  • has a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools or mainstream post 16 institutions.

In the Equality Act 2010a person is classed as disabled if they have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

  • Normal day-to-daymeans things that people do on a regular basis, for example mobility, dressing or cleaning (physical co-ordination), and having a conversation.
  • Long-term usually means the impairment should have lasted or be expected to last at least a year.
  • Substantialmeans not minor or trivial.
  • Physical impairment includes sensory difficulties such as visual or hearing impairments
  • Mental impairment includes learning difficulties, autism, dyslexia, speech and language difficulties, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Some specified medical conditions, such as HIV, multiple sclerosis and cancer are all considered as disabilities, regardless of their effect.

There are some specific conditions which will not amount to an impairment under the Equality Act 2010. For more information see our page on Disability Discrimination in Education.

Some examples of SEN are:

  • emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD);
  • Autism;
  • Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder (ADHD/ADD);
  • specific learning difficulties such as Dyslexia;
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder;
  • communication difficulties;
  • medical needs such as Epilepsy and Cerebral Palsy;
  • mobility difficulties.

If your child has SEN, they may need extra help in a range of areas, for example:

  • reading, writing, number work or understanding information;
  • expressing themselves or understanding what others are saying;
  • making friends or relating to adults;
  • behaving properly in school;
  • organising themselves;
  • sensory or physical needs which may affect them in school.

What can nurseries do to meet the needs of children aged 0-5 with SEN?

All state maintained nurseries must use best endeavours to ensure that the SEN of children attending the nursery are identified and met as quickly as possible. The nursery should have a detailed SEN policy about the support available.

What can schools do to meet the needs of children with SEN?

Every school is required to have systems in place to identify children who are in need of support and to assess, monitor and secure appropriate support forany SEN they may have. Under paragraph 6.2 of the "Special educational needs and disability code of practice: 0 to 25 years", each school must:

  • use their best endeavours to make sure that a child with SEN gets the support they need – this means doing everything they can to meet children and young people’s SEN;
  • ensure that children and young people with SEN engage in the activities of the school alongside pupils who do not have SEN;
  • designate a teacher to be responsible for co-ordinating SEN provision – the SEN co-ordinator, or ‘SENCO’ (not applicable to 16 to 19 academies);
  • inform parents when they are making special educational provision for a child;
  • prepare a SEN information report andsetting out:
    • their arrangements for the admission of disabled children;
    • the steps being taken to prevent disabled children from being treated less favourably than others;
    • the facilities provided to enable access to the school for disabled children; and
    • their accessibility plan showing how they plan to improve access progressively over time.

Schools are also required to involve parents in the process.

Schools are provided with additional money to provide support for children with SEN, this is called their delegated budget. Each child with SEN is entitled to receive up to £6,000 funding from their school per year.

(Video) SEN Online Information Sources UK

There are2 stages of support for meeting the needs of children with SEN:Additional SEN Support and anEducation, Health and Care Plan (EHCP).

What is Special Educational Provision?

Special educational provision is provision that is different from or additional to that normally available to pupils or students of the same age, which is designed to help children and young people with SEN or disabilities to access the National Curriculum at school or to study at college.

For children under 2 years old it is educational provision of any kind.

What can the school governing body do to meet the needs of children with SEN?

  • Develop and monitor the School’s SEN policy.
  • Ensure that all governors, especially SEN governors, are up to date and knowledgeable about the school’s SEN provision, including how funding, equipment and personnel resources are deployed.
  • Ensure that SEN provision is an integral part of the school’s development plan.
  • Ensure that the school’s notional SEN budget is appropriately allocated to support pupils with SEN.

Additional SEN Support

If a child is identified as struggling with their school work, and it is determined that this is being caused by a child’s underlying SEN, it may be necessary for a school to intervene to provide additional support for that child.

This support should be provided through a process known as ‘Additional SEN Support’. This is designed to help remove any barriers the child has to learning and put in place provision that will enable that child to benefit fully from their education.

This support should be provided through a continuously repeated 4-part cycle known as the ‘graduated approach’, revisiting and reappraising the support, and concentrating on what works best for the child.In this way,the supportshould become more refined and specialised over time, to ensurethat the childcontinues to make goodprogress at school and that the desired outcomes are reached.

The 4-part cycle is as follows:

1. Assess

This is when a child’s class or subject teacher along with the school’s SENCO work together to carry out a clear analysis of a child’s needs. This assessment process should not just involve the school themselves, the views of parents should also be sought and where appropriate the views of the child or young person. Where outside professionals are also involved with the child or young person, for example Children’s Services or health professionals, it may also be appropriate to seek their views. This assessment should be reviewed on a regular basis to make sure that the support being provided to a child continues to be effective and best matched to the child’s needs.

2. Plan

Where a school does decide to put in place Additional SEN support for a child, the parents should be formally notified of this. The child’s teachers and the school’s SENCO should then, in consultation with the parents and the pupil if appropriate, agree on the following:

  • the adjustments, interventions and support to be put in place;
  • the expected impact on progress, development or behaviour;
  • the desired outcomes for the child; and
  • aclear date for review

All teachers and support staff that work with the child should be made aware of the child’s needs and of the above plan, so they can make sure the ‘Plan’ is correctly implemented. The ‘Plan’ should also be placed on the child’s school record and should be accessible by parents.

3. Do

The child’s class teacher still remains responsible for working with the child on a day-to-day basis; this remains the case even if the support offered includes group or one to one teaching away from the child’s main class. This should all be done whilst working closely with any support or specialist staff involved.

The SENCO should remain closely involved in supporting the child’s class teacher, bothin terms of continuing to assess the child’s progress and needs and ensuring the planned support is being implemented properly.

4. Review

The success and effectiveness of the support provided should be reviewed on a regular basis and in line with the date agreed in the ‘Plan’ stage. During this ‘Review’ stage, the impact and quality of the support in place should be evaluated and the views of the parents and child should again be sought.

This review process should feed back to Part 1 of the cycle –the needs should again be assessed and the cycle should flow through again, with any changes needed to the support provided beingimplemented.

A spokesperson for the Department for Education has recommended that reviews with parents should take place at least3 times a year.

What happens if the support being provided through Additional SEN Support is not enough?

If the parents of a child does not believe that the support being provided to their child through Additional SEN Support is allowing the identified outcomes to be reached, they should first raise their concerns with the school’s SENCO – this should be done prior to the ‘Review’ stage. There is scope within Additional SEN Support for external specialists to become involved to support the child – for example, this could include:

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  • Behaviour Support Services;
  • Educational Psychologist;
  • Child and Adolescent Psychologists;
  • Speech and Language Therapists;
  • Occupational Therapists;
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS).

Parents have the right to be present at any interview, medical or other test during the statutory assessment, but sometimes the professionals may ask to see the child without a parent present. The parents should feel free to suggest any other people or organisations they know whose views may be helpful in the assessment of a child.

The school will not have received any additional funds to provide support at the Additional SEN Support stage. Any cost must be met though their delegated budget for children with SEN, this equates to the first £10,000 needed to educate the child. This figure is made up of a standard amount of £4,000 allocated to every pupil and then an additional £6,000 to provide SEN support.

If the SEN support provided by the school is not achieving the agreed outcomes then it can be adapted or replaced with new forms of support. If the school has taken relevant and purposeful action but the child is still not making the expected progress then the school or the parents can pursue an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) for the child. To initiate this process they can apply for an EHC needs assessment. An EHC needs assessment is an assessment of the educational, health care and social care needs of a child or young person.

When deciding whether to carry out an EHC needs assessment the Local Authority will consider:

  • evidence of the child or young person’s academic attainment (or developmental milestones in younger children) and rate of progress
  • information about the nature, extent and context of the child or young person’s SEN
  • evidence of the action already being taken by the early years provider, school or post-16 institution to meet the child or young person’s SEN
  • evidence that where progress has been made, it has only been as the result of much additional intervention and support over and above that which is usually provided
  • evidence of the child or young person’s physical, emotional and social development and health needs, drawing on relevant evidence from clinicians and other health professionals and what has been done to meet these by other agencies

What can the LEA do to meet the needs of children with SEN?

  • Identify, assess and provide for children with SEN.
  • Audit, plan, monitor and review SEN provision.
  • Provide support through an information, support and advice service (IASS) for young people with SEN.
  • Liase with other partners whose job it is to support children with SEN (such as schools, colleges, and health bodies).
  • Secure training, advice and support for staff working with SEN.

Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs)

If the Local Authority conduct an EHC needs assessment and determine that the child does require an EHCP then they can work to put one in place.

The purpose of an EHCP is:

  • to make special educational provision to the meet the SEN of the child or young person;
  • so as to secure the best possible outcomes for them across education, health and social care, and
  • to prepare them for adulthood, as they grow older.

Under paragraph 9.2 of the “Special educational needs and disability code of practice: 0 to 25 years“, the assessment and EHCP, if granted, should:

  • establish and record the views, interests and aspirations of the parents and child or young person;
  • provide a full description of the child or young person’s SEN and any health and social care needs;
  • establish outcomes across education, health and social care based on the child or young person’s needs and aspirations;
  • specify the provision required and how education, health and care services will work together to meet the child or young person’s needs and support the achievement of the agreed outcomes.

An EHCP is legally binding – the support detailed in the Plan must be provided. These Plans can be in place for children or young people between birth and the age of 25. Young people aged 18-25 with an EHCP will continue to have their needs reviewed on at least an annual basis, to ensure the right level of support is being provided across the areas of education, health and social care.

How a parent can raise concerns

1. Speak to thechild’s teacher

If you have concerns with regards to your child’s education and you feel that they are not coping with their school work, you should raise your concerns with your child’s teacher. This may be their class teacher or head of year.

At this meeting, you may wish to provide evidence to the teacher supporting your concerns. This could include homework, test results and any other work. You may also wish to discuss with the teacher any change you have noticed in your child, such as them becoming more anxious, their behaviour deteriorating or any health condition that has been recently diagnosed.

During this meeting, you and the teacher should try and work together to address any concerns andto decide whetherany action needs to be taken. It is important that you make note of any recommendations made and any plan that is being implemented. You should then make another meeting date, to follow up on any implementations that have been suggested.

After this meeting, it is important that you keep a track of how your child is progressing. If you do not feel that any progress has been made, you should meet with the teacher again or consider the next step.

2. Have a meeting with the SENCO

Every school must have a SEN Co-ordinator (SENCO). A SENCO has to be a qualified teacher and may also have another job title within the school, such as Deputy Head Teacher.

The role of the SENCO is to ensure that all the special needs provision are met at the school. If you and the school are concerned that your child is still not making any progress, a meeting with the SENCO should be arranged. You can make a written request to the SENCO, requesting a meeting and setting out your concerns. At this point, you may wish to request a copy of the school’s policy on SEN and also your child’s school records, to assess whether you feel the school are fulfilling their duty.

When you have a meeting with the SENCO, you will want to discuss whether the SENCO feels your child has any SEN and the support that the school can provide for them.

It will be at this point that Additional SEN Support could be discussed with you. You and the SENCO should work together to put in place any targets or desired outcomes for your child. It is important that you make a note of anything agreed at this meeting as well.

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If you feel it is necessary, you can also ask the school if they can arrange any assessments from outside specialists, such as Speech and Language Therapists or Educational Psychologists.

As discussed above, any support provided through Additional SEN Support should be reviewed regularly to ensure that outcomes are being met by your child and that they are receiving the support necessary. If this isn’t the case, you may wish to follow the next stage below.

It is important that you keep a track of how your child is progressing

3. Education, Health and Care needs assessment

If your child is not reaching any targets or outcomes set through Additional SEN Support, it may be necessary to apply for an Education, Health and Care needs assessment to the Local Authority. This can be made by the school or by yourself. You should set out what your child’s SEN is, the difficulties that they are having, the current support that they are receiving and the evidence of additional support needed.The Local Authority will assess your child if they have or may have SEN and special provision may be necessary.

The purpose of the assessment is to establish whether your child’s SEN requires additional provision through an EHCP. If an EHCP is issued, this will set out the additional support for education, social care and health care and the budget provided for this.

For further information, please see our ‘How-To Guide’ on"SENNeeds Assessments and Education, Health and Care Plans".

4. Appeals relating to an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP)

If an EHCP is made and parents have concerns with regards to the contents of the Plan, they can appeal to the First Tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs and Disability). For Wales, see the Special Educational Tribunal for Wales.

An appeal can be made on the basis of:

  • a refusal to carry out an Education, Health and Care needs assessment or reassessment;
  • a refusal to issue an EHCP;
  • a refusal to amend an EHCPfollowing reassessment or annual review;
  • the content of anEHCP in:
    • Part B – a child’s SEN;
    • Part F – a child’s provision to meet their SEN;
    • Part I – the educational establishment named in the Plan;
  • a Local Authority’s decision to cease to maintain a child’s EHCP.

For further information on appeals, please see our ‘How-To Guide’ on SEN:.

What if my child is already receiving support for their SEN?

Additional SEN Support and EHCPswere implementedas a result of Part 3 Children and Families Act 2014 and have been in place since 1 September 2014. Prior to this date, many children will have received support through different mechanisms.

Some children may have been receiving support through ‘School Action‘ or ‘School Action Plus’. These support arrangements have now been replaced with ‘Additional SEN Support’. If your child was receiving support through ‘School Action’ or ‘School Action Plus’ before the changes,they should automatically have been moved onto ‘Additional SEN Support’. If you have doubts about whether this has happened, you should discuss this with your child’s school’s SENCO.

If your child currently receives support through a Statement of Special Education Needs (SSEN), these remain legally binding and the child’s support should not be removed.From 1 September 2014, no new requests for SSENs have been accepted,the appropriate application being for an EHCP.

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The government intends for all children with SSENs to transition to EHCPs by 1April 2018. This transition will take placevia a ‘transfer review’, replacing the annual review in the year of transition. Local Authorities should seek to transfer those already on SSENs to EHCPs at key transition points in their education, for example:

  • children transferring from an early years setting to a school;
  • children transferring from an infant to a junior school;
  • children transferring from primary to secondary school;
  • children transferring from mainstream to a specialist school, or vice versa;
  • children in Year 9 (in line with therequirement under EHCPs for adulthood to be prepared for from Year 9 onwards);
  • children in Year 11;
  • children moving to further education.

If the person receiving support is a young person, i.e. over 16, and they currently receive SEN support through a Learning Difficulty Assessment (LDA), they will also at some stage transition across to an EHCP, unless the LDA comes to an end before the date for transition. The transition phase for those on LDAs will last until 1September 2016. Until a young person has transferred to an EHCP, they should continue to receive support through their LDA.

For those who already have a request for Statutory Assessments for SSENs on-going, the Local Authority could still issue a SSEN, though the Local Authority may seek parental consent to issue an EHCP instead.

If a parent has an ongoing request for a SSEN that is refused, or is having problems with an existing SSEN, they will still be able to appeal to the First Tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs & Disabilities)to try and resolve these issues.

Please see our ‘How to Guide’ on SEN: "" for further information.

What is the Local Offer?

From 1 September 2014, all Local Authorities must publish a detailed summary of the services available to support children and young people with SEN and disabilities named the ‘Local Offer‘. This should cover services for education, health and social care and should include information about services available in neighbouring boroughs. The SEND Code of Practice sets out in detail what the Local Offer should do:

  • provide clear, comprehensive, accessible and up-to-date information about the available provision and how to access it;
  • target provision specifically to meet local needs and aspirations.

Local Authorities should involve children and young people with SEN and disabilities and their parents and service providers im developing and reviewing the Local Offer.

Schedule 2 Special Educational Needs and Disability Regulations 2014 provides a common framework for the Local Offer.

The Local Offer must include information about:

  • special educational, health and social care provision for children and young people with SEN or disabilities (including online and blended learning);
  • details of how parents and young people can request an assessment for an EHCP;
  • arrangements for identifying and assessing children and young people’s SEN – this should include arrangements for EHC needs assessments;
  • other educational provision, for example sports or arts provision, paired reading schemes;
  • post-16 education and training provision;
  • apprenticeships, traineeships and supported internships;
  • information about provision to assist in preparing children and young people for adulthood;
  • arrangements for travel to and from schools, post-16 institutions and early years providers;
  • support to help children and young people move between phases of education (for example from early years to school, from primary to secondary);
  • sources of information, advice and support in the Local Authority’s area relating to SEN and disabilities including information and advice provided under Section 32 Children and Families Act 2014, forums for parents and carers and support groups;
  • childcare, including suitable provision for disabled children and those with SEN;
  • leisure activities;
  • support available to young people in higher education, particularly the Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) and the process and timescales for making an application for DSA;
  • arrangements for resolving disagreements and for mediation, and details about making complaints;
  • parents’ and young people’s rights to appeal a decision of the Local Authority to the First-tier Tribunal (SEN& Disability) in respect of SEN and provision;
  • the Local Authority’s accessibility strategy (under Equality Act 2010,Schedule10,paragraph1);
  • institutions approved under Section 41 Children and Families Act 2014.

The Local Offer should cover:

  • support available to all children and young people with SEN or disabilities from universal services such as schools and GPs;
  • targeted services for children and young people with SEN or disabilities who require additional short-term support over and above that provided routinely as part of universal services;
  • specialist services for children and young people with SEN or disabilities who require specialised, longer term support.

Can the Local Government Ombudsman look in to the local authority failure to support my child’s SEN?

The Local Government Ombudsman (LGO) can look in to some complaints about the failure of a council to deal properly with a child’s SEN. The LGO can investigate:

  1. delay in assessing a child for SEN;
  2. delay in issuing a Statement of SEN or EHCP;
  3. failure to implement a Statement of SEN or EHCP;
  4. failure to carry out an annual review;
  5. failure to follow the SEND Regulations 2014 and SEND Code of Practice;
  6. failure to follow the formal transitional arrangements;
  7. complaints about Personal Budgets;
  8. failure to involve children and young people over the age of 16 in decisions about their provision;
  9. complaints about the Local Offer;
  10. complaint about the council’s response about a failure of a school to provide additional SEN support.

The LGO cannot look into complaints where there is a right of appeal to the SEN Tribunal. For more information see our ‘How-To Guide’ on "Appealingan Education, Health and Care Plan or a Statement of SEN".

If the LGO finds that your child’s SEN has not been dealt with appropriately they can order and apology, and in some instances compensation. It can order that theLocal Authorityprovide further help to your child. For more information see the LGO factsheet.

Further information

The Department forEducation has released a SEND Guide for Parents and Carers.

For Wales, see the Special Educational Tribunal for Wales.

Send complaints: Guide for young people aged 16 to 25.

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FAQs

Do SEN children get extra funding? ›

Schools are also required to involve parents in the process. Schools are provided with additional money to provide support for children with SEN, this is called their delegated budget.

What are the 4 levels of SEN? ›

SEN Support is the system by which schools should assess the needs of children, and then provide appropriate support. The system should follow four stages, often referred to as a 'cycle': Assess, Plan, Do, Review.

What are the 4 different categories of special educational needs? ›

There are four types of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), as defined by the Department for Education:
  • Communication and interaction.
  • Cognition and learning.
  • Social, mental and emotional health.
  • Sensory or physical.

Do parents get money for an Ehcp? ›

Personal budgets and direct payments can be requested by a child's parents or a young person once the LA has agreed to prepare an EHCP or during a statutory review of the EHCP. Local Authorities must consider each request for a personal budget on its individual merits.

What are SEN children entitled to? ›

What happens if a child has SEN? The first and most important thing to remember is that all children with SEN are entitled to receive a broad, balanced and suitable education which includes the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum (for children aged 3 to 5) or the National Curriculum (for children aged 5 to 16).

What is SEN allowance? ›

You may be entitled to an SEN allowance if you are: In any SEN post that requires a mandatory SEN qualification. Having a greater level of involvement in the teaching of children with SEN than is the normal requirement of teachers throughout the school.

What is the most common SEN? ›

Dyslexia. Number one in this list probably won't be a surprise for many readers. An estimated 700 million people worldwide have dyslexia, and this prevalence has been reflected in my own experience as a teacher.

What is an SEN level 5? ›

The SEN Teaching course Diploma Level 5 is suitable for aspiring SEN teaching assistants and those who are new to the field who wish to gain the skills, knowledge to accelerate their career. It is ideal for those who want to familiarise with SEN teaching practices and principles.

What is the most common type of SEN? ›

The most common type of need among pupils with SEN support are speech, language and communication needs.

What are the three most common disabilities in special education? ›

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Learning Disabilities. Mobility Disabilities.

What are the 3 R's in special education? ›

The 3 R's To Bullying Prevention for Students with Special Educational Needs: Recognize, Respond, and Report. SESS is happy to announce a series of seminars by Dr Lori Ernsperger, Ph. D, BCBA-D. Dr.

Can a nursery refuse a child with SEN? ›

Schools, early years childcare settings, local councils and other organisations that provide services to your child must not discriminate against them if they are disabled, and must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that they have the same play and learning opportunities as other children.

What does an Ehcp entitle you to? ›

Children with an EHCP will usually be entitled to extra one-to-one support in school (though not necessarily full-time) and will have outside agencies involved in their support, such as physiotherapists, behavioural experts or sensory impairment teachers.

What can Ehcp money be spent on? ›

It can be used to buy education, health and / or care services as set out in the EHC plan. You don't have to have a personal budget.

Do children with Ehcp get DLA? ›

Can I Get DLA if My Child Has an EHCP? If you look after a child who has Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), you might be entitled to certain benefits such as Disability Living Allowance (DLA) whether they have an EHCP or not. You can visit the gov.uk website to read about what you're entitled to.

Does SEN count as a disability? ›

Children and young people who have special educational needs (SEN) do not necessarily have a disability. Some disabled children and young people do not have special educational needs. There is a lot of overlap between the two groups though.

Does a SENCO get SEN allowance? ›

There's no payment or allowance specifically designed for special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCOs) under the STPCD and you don't have to award a pay increase to a newly qualified SENCO. However, a SENCO may be eligible for 2 other types of additional payments: Teaching and learning responsibility (TLR) payments.

How is SEN funding paid? ›

All mainstream schools receive money for special educational needs support and resources. Schools can decide how to spend this money. This is called “delegated” funding because it is given (delegated) to schools by local authorities or the Education Funding Agency from money they receive from central government.

Who qualifies for SEN? ›

Nursery age students qualify for SEN, as do young adults in further education, up to the age of 25. Young people from 16 have different rights to children under the age of 16 and this means that they get a say in their support and will need to be included more at various stages of the assessment and planning.

Does SEN include gifted and talented? ›

Do gifted children have special needs? Giftedness or high ability does not legally fall in the category of special educational needs (SEN), so there are no additional resources available for a child assessed as highly able.

What is SEN top up funding? ›

Top-up funding is intended to “enable a pupil or student with high needs to participate in education and learning”. It should reflect the cost of: Additional support to meet an individual pupil's needs. Facilities required to support a pupil's educational needs (either for individuals or on offer to all)

Is ADHD classed as special needs? ›

In our experience, ADHD will always qualify as being a special educational need because children or young people with ADHD tend to need support which is additional, or different, to that provided to pupils without ADHD. Early identification can be very important for pupils with ADHD.

How is SEN diagnosed? ›

There are various ways to get a diagnosis. These can include: the hospital or your health visitor referring you to a specialist or doctor. your child's teacher or school referring you to an educational psychologist or a Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO)

What conditions are special needs? ›

Special needs can range from people with autism, Asperger syndrome, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, blindness, deafness, ADHD, and cystic fibrosis. They can also include cleft lips and missing limbs.

What SEN category is dyslexia? ›

What is SEN? Dyslexia falls under the definition of a Special Educational Need defined under s20 Childrens and Families Act 2014 (CFA) as where the child has as a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made.

How much does a SEN teacher earn UK? ›

The average salary for SEN Teacher jobs is £44,222. Read on to find out how much SEN Teacher jobs pay across various UK locations and industries. We have 298 jobs paying higher than the average SEN Teacher salary!

Can I work as an SNA with Level 5? ›

Progression to Further Studies

This course leads to a level 5 award on the National Framework of Qualifications and, on successful completion, participants will be qualified to work as SNAs in primary, post-primary, and special school settings.

Does mental health come under SEN? ›

When mental health difficulties affect a child or young person's progress in education. If a child or young person's mental health difficulties become a barrier to learning they may need special educational provision. This is known as special educational needs support (SEN Support).

What are the most common special needs in children? ›

I therefore list here some of the most common types of special educational needs (SEN), their symptoms and targeted teaching strategies to deal with them:
  1. ADHD.
  2. Anxiety.
  3. Asperger's Syndrome.
  4. Dyscalculia.
  5. Dysgraphia. ...
  6. Dyslexia.
  7. Hearing impairment.
  8. Oppositional defiant disorder.
20 Nov 2019

Does SEN include mental health? ›

These special needs do include social, emotional or mental health difficulties such as establishing friendships, relating to peers/adults or behaving properly in an early years setting, school or college. Schools must have a SEN Co-ordinator (SENCO) who is responsible for co-ordinating help for children with SEN.

What is the most approved disability? ›

What Is the Most Approved Disability? Arthritis and other musculoskeletal system disabilities make up the most commonly approved conditions for social security disability benefits. This is because arthritis is so common. In the United States, over 58 million people suffer from arthritis.

What are three of the biggest challenges for children with special needs? ›

It is possible for preschoolers to develop mental health conditions like anxiety and depression.
...
Anxiety and depression
  • extreme separation anxiety.
  • extreme fear of going to school or entering other social situations.
  • developing phobias.
  • repetitive behaviors.
23 Jun 2022

What are the 7 types of disability? ›

  • Physical Disability. Locomotor Disability. Leprosy Cured Person. Cerebral Palsy. ...
  • Intellectual Disability. Specific Learning Disabilities. Autism Spectrum Disorder.
  • Mental Behaviour (Mental Illness)
  • Disability caused due to- Chronic Neurological Conditions such as- Multiple Sclerosis. Parkinson's Disease. ...
  • Multiple Disabilities.
25 Apr 2022

How does an SNA keep a record of her work? ›

The SNA must maintain a written record of information relevant to a review of the 'child's' inclusion /care plan in a notebook or diary. The SNA should communicate relevant information efficiently to the class teacher. Care should be taken that teaching time is not diminished.

Whats the difference between school support and school support plus? ›

School Support Plus will generally involve personnel outside the school team in the problem solving, assessment and intervention process. However, the information from Classroom and School Support work will provide the starting point for problem-solving at this level.

Who is responsible for inclusion in schools? ›

Ofsted considers inclusion in their school inspections and also provides guidance for schools. Inclusion in schools is considered by Ofsted through the three following questions: 1 Do all pupils get a fair deal at school? 2 How well does the school recognise and overcome barriers to learning?

Can you home school a child with SEN? ›

If your child has special educational needs ( SEN )

If your child has SEN and attends a special school, you'll need to get the council's permission to educate them at home. You do not need the council's permission if your child attends a mainstream school, even if they have an education, health and care (EHC) plan.

How do you calm a SEN child? ›

Meltdowns
  1. letting your child wear headphones to listen to calming music.
  2. turning down or removing bright lights.
  3. distraction techniques, such as fiddle toys.
  4. planning ahead for any change in routine, such as a different route to school.

Do SEN children have to follow the National Curriculum? ›

Independent schools for pupils with SEN

You are not required to follow the National Curriculum, but must offer a balanced and broadly based curriculum.

What are the cons of Ehcp? ›

  • Lack of positive outcomes despite EHCPs being in place.
  • EHCPs do not protect the most vulnerable as more pupils with SEND are pushed out of schools.
  • There has never been more children with an EHCP than now. ...
  • Not value for money – EHCP processes are bureaucratic, costly and time inefficient.
11 Dec 2019

What are the 5 stages of an Ehcp? ›

(A) The views, interests and aspirations of the child and their parents, or of the young person (B) The child or young person's special educational needs (SEN) (C) The child or young person's health needs which relate to their SEN (D) The child or young person's social care needs which relate to their SEN (E) The ...

How many hours can you get on an Ehcp? ›

If the EHCP caters for 'Band C', then the child or young person is entitled to between 10 and 15 hours of support. But which is it? The point of an EHCP is to let the reader know exactly what support is required. Any uncertainty is not only unhelpful, it is unlawful.

Do parents get money for Ehcp? ›

Personal budgets and direct payments can be requested by a child's parents or a young person once the LA has agreed to prepare an EHCP or during a statutory review of the EHCP. Local Authorities must consider each request for a personal budget on its individual merits.

How is Ehcp funding calculated? ›

The amount paid for pupils with an EHCP will be based on the number of school days that the pupil is on the school roll in that month as a proportion of the total number of school days in the full financial year (April to March).

Can an Ehcp pay for private school? ›

If your child has an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP), the Local Authority (LA) has a legal duty to fund the provision within a maintained setting. This duty does not extend to Independent mainstream schools.

Does autism qualify for Ehcp? ›

Many children/YP with autism have an EHCP maintained for them but it is important to make sure the content of that EHCP (Section B – needs, and Section F – provision) are clear, up to date and detailed. Section B (SEN) is made up of four types of SEN: Cognition and Learning. Communication and Interaction.

How much is DLA for a child with ADHD? ›

You can get between £24.45 and £156.90 a week in Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to help look after a child who has a disability or health condition. DLA isn't means tested, so how much you earn doesn't impact how much you can get. The money can be spent on anything.

What are SEN children entitled to? ›

What happens if a child has SEN? The first and most important thing to remember is that all children with SEN are entitled to receive a broad, balanced and suitable education which includes the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum (for children aged 3 to 5) or the National Curriculum (for children aged 5 to 16).

Do schools get extra funding for send? ›

Schools get money for each pupil, based on actual pupil numbers. This is called the Age Weighted Pupil Unit (AWPU) and it is part of schools delegated funding. Some of this money is for general SEN provision.

Do you get benefits for SEN? ›

Benefits you may be able to claim

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for children. Child Tax Credit and Universal Credit. Carer's Allowance. Direct Payments from social care.

What is SEN top up funding? ›

Top-up funding is intended to “enable a pupil or student with high needs to participate in education and learning”. It should reflect the cost of: Additional support to meet an individual pupil's needs. Facilities required to support a pupil's educational needs (either for individuals or on offer to all)

What is SEN Inclusion funding? ›

The SEN Inclusion Fund (SENIF) is funding available to early years settings for supporting children with learning and developmental delay or SEND. The funding is for use in the early years setting that your child attends and will be paid to the provider to support your child's identified needs.

How much does a school get for a SEN child? ›

A mainstream school has up to £6,000 from its SEN budget to spend on each child who needs additional help to make progress. In a Pupil Referral Unit (a specialist setting for children/young people without a school place) that figure is £8,000 and in a special school it is £10,000.

Can a school refuse a child with SEN? ›

The Equality Act 2010 says schools mustn't discriminate against a pupil because of their disability. This is unlawful under the Act. In some situations, schools must also take positive steps so that disabled pupils can access and participate in the education and other activities they provide.

Can a nursery refuse a child with SEN? ›

Schools, early years childcare settings, local councils and other organisations that provide services to your child must not discriminate against them if they are disabled, and must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that they have the same play and learning opportunities as other children.

Does SEN count as a disability? ›

Children and young people who have special educational needs (SEN) do not necessarily have a disability. Some disabled children and young people do not have special educational needs. There is a lot of overlap between the two groups though.

Does a Senco get SEN allowance? ›

There's no payment or allowance specifically designed for special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCOs) under the STPCD and you don't have to award a pay increase to a newly qualified SENCO. However, a SENCO may be eligible for 2 other types of additional payments: Teaching and learning responsibility (TLR) payments.

What benefits can my autistic son claim? ›

Benefits you can get Advice & Support for:
  • Disability Living Allowance.
  • Carer's Allowance.
  • Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit.
  • Housing Benefit and help with Council Tax or Rates.
  • Income Support.
  • Universal Credit.
  • Challenging benefit decisions.
  • More information.
14 Dec 2020

Who receives top up funding? ›

If a pupil in your education setting has very complex needs and requires specialist help to make progress with their education, you can apply for additional funding. This is called 'element 3' or 'Top Up' funding. You must only use Top Up funding to provide support for the pupil you request it for.

What help can I get if my child has an Ehcp? ›

This could include:
  • a special learning programme for your child.
  • extra help from a teacher or a learning support assistant.
  • working with your child in a small group.
  • supporting your child with physical or personal care difficulties, such as eating, getting around school safely, toileting or dressing.
24 Feb 2021

How many hours is a full Ehcp? ›

If the EHCP caters for 'Band C', then the child or young person is entitled to between 10 and 15 hours of support. But which is it? The point of an EHCP is to let the reader know exactly what support is required. Any uncertainty is not only unhelpful, it is unlawful.

Who qualifies for SEN? ›

Nursery age students qualify for SEN, as do young adults in further education, up to the age of 25. Young people from 16 have different rights to children under the age of 16 and this means that they get a say in their support and will need to be included more at various stages of the assessment and planning.

What is the local offer for SEN? ›

A local offer is for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) aged 0 to 25 years. It provides information and support services available to families in their local area. The name the 'local offer' is a term from the national government.

Do independent schools get SEN funding? ›

If your child has an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP), the Local Authority (LA) has a legal duty to fund the provision within a maintained setting. This duty does not extend to Independent mainstream schools.

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